Thursday, December 13, 2012

Day 348 of 365

When did it become so offensive to say Merry Christmas? Everywhere we have been shopping this week I try to say Merry Christmas, because it's that time of year and I have never heard so many people stutter and stammer and avoid saying it as much as I have this year.

I have friends that are of different religions but they don't have a problem with people telling them Merry Christmas... That's why when I walked into J.C.Penney tonight and saw this I was elated.... Here is a company that doesn't post season's greetings or Happy Holidays but tells it like it is...

From AllThingsChristmas.com

The term Merry Christmas doesn’t have any religious bias and is often used by people of all races and religious backgrounds, during Christmas time. It reflects that messages of love, joy and well wishes can be communicated irrespective of belief systems. It’s a greeting that makes total strangers make instant connection. It’s a message that dissolves anger. It’s a message that evaporates misunderstanding between loved ones and creates a bridge to the beginning of a new relationship. It’s amazing that these two simple words “Merry Christmas” can have this profound effect.

The phrase “Happy Christmas” was used by Queen Elizabeth II of Great Britain and proceeded to gain popularity in that part of the world. In fact, in the concluding lines of his now famous “A visit from St. Nicholas”, Clement Moore actually used “Happy Christmas.”
There are groups that are opposed to the use of “Merry Christmas” and would prefer something more general term like the “Happy Christmas.” However, it’s interesting to note that in 2005 a survey discovered that more consumers used “Merry Christmas” than “Happy Christmas”, primarily in the message of greeting cards.
The fact remains that no matter what term you use, it’s the intent that matters. Use of words is merely an audible method of sending a message. Words have no meaning in themselves, other than the one perceived by the person who hears it. And when we are using something like “Merry Christmas”, is there any doubt about our intentions?


Again, just because you tell some one Merry Christmas, doesn't mean you are preaching to them... It doesn't mean you are trying to sell them your religious beliefs... It means you are wishing them good will, joy and cheer...

Love, peace and it's OK to say Merry Christmas...
Musicsongbird